Badin Hall re-opened after renovation

Badin Hall

As part of the University’s master plan to assess and address the needs of each residence hall, Badin Hall underwent renovations during the 2017-18 academic year. While the Bullfrogs were temporarily housed in Pangborn Hall, an elevator, air-conditioned kitchens and lounges, and a new chapel were added to Badin.

The original building was constructed in 1897 as an industrial school where men were taught to become blacksmiths, carpenters, bricklayers, and farmers, before being converted into a men’s dormitory in 1917. In 1972, as Notre Dame became co-ed, Badin was one of two halls converted to house the first female undergraduates.

Though Badin is the smallest women’s hall with a capacity of just 131 residents, it is known for its tight-knit community, says Badin’s rector, Sister Susan Sisko, O.S.B.M. The new lounges and kitchens offer even more space for residents to cultivate that community, she says.

Badin Hall 3

The improved spaces, and thus opportunities for community, prayer, and growth highlight Notre Dame’s continued commitment to residential life.

Arwa Mohammad ’19 agreed. In an August 2018 interview with The Observer, she said, “People are actively making efforts to come sit in the lounge spaces as opposed to just passing by…They hang out there, which is nice. People in Badin tend to be very social anyway but I really feel like the air conditioning has helped facilitate that.”

Residence Halls with C.S.C. Religious

Count of undergraduate residence halls

Badin Graph

The women also now have an impressive new chapel where they can gather as a community of faith. The St. Stephen chapel was generously donated by the Baranay family, along with 20th century stained glass windows given by alumni Charles Hayes and Jon Ritten. There, the Bullfrogs can now celebrate Mass with a new priest-in-residence, Rev. E. William Beauchamp, C.S.C., whose apartment was also added to the hall during construction. He now lives among the women and offers Mass three evenings per week.

The improved spaces, and thus opportunities for community, prayer, and growth highlight Notre Dame’s continued commitment to residential life. The residential life experience at the University is distinctive as it is grounded in the vision of Blessed Basil Moreau, C.S.C. It was he who insisted that the heart, as well as the mind, must be shaped. That formation perhaps most deeply occurs in the residence halls.